Suspect in Boca Raton car burglaries ID’d

BOCA RATON, Fla. – Police in Boca Raton said one person was taken into custody Tuesday morning in connection with a car burglary case.

Around 5:30 a.m., police asked residents just south of Lynn University to stay indoors while police and K9s searched for car burglars.

Authorities said burglars broke into several vehicles around Banyan Boulevard Circle and Northwest 30th Way near the Boca Bath and Tennis Club.

The suspects were riding around the neighborhood on bicycles, police said.

A police K9 helped arrest one suspect identified as 19-year-old John Perkins of Coconut Creek.

He had property from five car break-ins on the ground near him, police said.

Perkins is facing charges of burglary and grand theft.

Police said he took a bus from Broward County to meet a friend he identified as Chico and they decided to go to Boca Bath and Tennis, smoke weed and break into cars.

Chico has not yet been found.

American Diabetes Association Honors Boca Raton Regional Hospital

BOCA RATON, FL (BocaNewsNow.com) (Source: Boca Raton Regional Hospital) — The Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Education* Program at Boca Raton Regional Hospital’s Gloria Drummond Physical Rehabilitation Institute has been awarded continued recognition from the American Diabetes Association (ADA). The program was first awarded and accredited from the ADA in 1999.

The ADA Education Recognition effort is a voluntary process which assures that approved programs have met the national standards for diabetes self-management education programs. Accreditation and recognition criteria are sent for consideration every four years for granting excellence in diabetes education and positive patient outcomes.

The staff at Boca Raton Regional Hospital’s Diabetes Center is dedicated to providing the most comprehensive diabetes program to empower people with diabetes and their families with support and education. Program participants are taught, self-care skills that promote better management from knowledgeable health professionals. Topics discussed include: the disease process, nutritional management, physical activity, medications, monitoring, prevention, detection and goal setting.

“Our Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Education Program focuses on high-quality education for patient self-care,” said Nancy Talio, RN, BSN, CDE, CPT, Director of the Program. “Through the support of our team and increased knowledge and awareness, the patient can assume part of their disease management responsibility. We are proud to have earned this recognition once again.”

BocaNewsNow.com is the leading hyper-local news website based in and serving Boca Raton, Florida and South Palm Beach County. Our pages have been visited millions of times over our five year history of reporting, providing opinion and snark.

This is not a “mug shot” website. Arrest reports and mugshots are provided by law enforcement officials under Florida Statute. While we review all requests for removal, we are not obligated to remove reports that are a part of the public record.

When removal is appropriate, we do so at no charge. We do not accept payment for mugshot or arrest report deletion.

We remind our readers that an arrest is an accusation. Guilt or innocence is determined in a court of law. Email us at news (at) bocanewsnow.com or telephone 561-419-9520.

All Content Copyright © 2017 MetroDesk Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

How to Tell If Your Moving Company is a Good One

You have a million different decisions to make when you undertake a new move, so the more confidence you can place in your moving company, the better. Once you find the right moving company for you, that organization can provide you with guidance and advice that will see you through the rest of the way. But how do you know what company is the best for your needs? Here are some things you should look for when deciding which group should help with your move.

Location

Ideally, your moving company should have a main office either in the location you are moving from or the one you are moving to. If you are moving to Leduc, for example, it makes more sense to find moving service in Leduc than to seek out a company that has more familiarity with another region. Finding a local moving company is important because it gives you a group that can provide you with information about the region and offers you the resources of somebody who knows the area well. Moving is all about anticipating problems and adjusting to them as they come up. A local mover can do that more effectively than somebody who does not have experience in your area.

Reputation

Thanks to the Internet, you can do your research on moving companies before you make a selection. Online reviews are a good source to mine for this purpose, but you should make sure that you read a wide variety of different reviews so you don’t wind up getting a false sense of perspective based on one or two strong feelings. Getting word of mouth reviews from people you know is even better, since you can take the tastes of the individual person into account. When it comes to good reviews, TopNotchMovers.ca is a mover in Edmonton that has excellent word of mouth and online reviews, making a terrific option for individuals in the Edmonton area.

Experience

Finally, you want to make sure that you hire a moving crew with experience. While there is nothing wrong with supporting a small startup company, you should realize the risks that you are undertaking when you do so. A moving crew with experience can naturally help you move in a faster and more efficient manner, but it can also help you throughout the process. These moving companies can give you advice about the area you are moving to, provide packing materials to help you protect your precious belongings and furniture, and much more. An experienced moving crew is one that can make your entire move simpler from start to finish.

If you can find a moving company close to you that has a solid reputation and the level of experience that you desire, you should reach out to them immediately. Contacting a moving company at least six months before your planned move date can give you a great leg up in terms of resources, packing materials, and advice to make sure that your move is an effective one.

Are Millennials Really That Different From Other Generations?

Shutterstock

Roughly once a week, I’m asked, “Are millennials really that different from other generations?”

I figured it would make sense to share my response with you, distilled into four pivotal factors.

1. Generationally, we are different.

Millennials, individuals who are now between 18-35 years old, were born and raised with different inciting incidents (9/11), different economic factors (the 2008 market crash) and a different culture (helicopter parenting, car seats and more). These factors helped to mold us as a population.

Where baby boomers are loyal to their company and Generation X are more loyal to their careers, millennials’ loyalty lies with their community. We see work as a calling instead of a job, or even a career. Although subtle, this distinction does change the expectations we have of our jobs. Millennials show up looking to make an impact, be part of a team and do meaningful work — work that makes a difference in the world.

Millennials drive companies to challenge the status quo of how the workplace currently operates.

2. There is a new model for the world of work.

Over the last 40 years, as technology has enabled us to automate basic tasks, the type of work we’ve done has changed. We are no longer on the assembly line, making one widget repeatedly. We’ve moved from the Industrial Revolution’s working economy to the knowledge economy, where employees come up with creative solutions to complex problems.

It is no longer sufficient to simply know the task that needs completing. As a knowledge worker, we need to see the bigger picture, the purpose of our work and the problem it is solving,

Although this type of work is completely different, the model of work has yet to change. We are no longer working on assembly lines in factories; nevertheless, we are still expecting people to show up and clock into an office. Many companies are working off a broken model where you are measured by the time you put in versus the output of the work you produce. Millennials, the gig economy, and the future of work are calling for companies to focus on outcomes, not hours.

The old model, which is contradictory to the type of work we are asking people to do, is being questioned by millennials, as they are the first full generation to enter the workforce unbiased by the old, working economy way of work. 

3. The need for “on-demand” is on the rise. 

Millennials have grown up in an on-demand society with pretty much everything at our fingertips. Take a typical day in the life of a millennial, Katy.

Katy wakes up and realizes she’s out of milk, eggs and mouthwash, so she hops onto Amazon, and by the time she’s home from the gym, there’s a delivery at her door. She eats breakfast and orders her ride to work. While at work, Katy toggles between her work email, Gchat, text messages and seeing what everyone’s been up to on Facebook and LinkedIn. On her Lyft home, she orders dinner from her phone and gets it just in time to sit on her couch and choose from thousands of titles to binge watch for the night.

We live in a world where virtually anything can be taken care of in a matter of minutes, right from a device that’s the size of our palm. The impact on our habits and society is noticeable. Our need for instant gratification is at an all-time high. If we want something, we no longer understand what it means to wait.

It also plays a role in ballooning our expectations. Our social network is not an authentic place to connect with friends; instead, it’s become a place to promote the best version of ourselves, whether true or not, to the world. It’s now easier than ever to see what everyone in our social network is doing, where your friend just traveled for vacation, which friend just got a new job, which one just quit their job and went off on a three-month road trip, who’s been promoted and whose company just raised a bunch of money. In this world, the grass is always greener; it makes you examine your life and how it compares to the Photoshopped versions your network promotes on their feeds.

Our increased need for instant gratification — coupled with increased options and visibility to others’ success — drives millennials to seek success, contribution and personal growth at a more rapid rate than other previous generations. Technology has accelerated the millennial timeline.

4. Mid-life crises are accelerating.

Rob, like many teenagers, went to high school with the goal — as determined by his family, teachers and our society — to go to a good college. Once he accomplished this, the societal expectations were to get a good job. In order not to disrupt the status quo, and mostly because he’d adopted these expectations as his own, Rob found a good job.

Twenty years passed, and one day, Rob woke up asking himself, what am I doing? Why am I here, on this earth? What impact do I want to have on the world? What is my purpose?

Rob hit his mid-life crisis, a point in his life where he re-examined his goals and ambitions because for the very first time in his life, there was no one else to tell him what his goals should be. Now he’s got to figure them out on his own.

Due to a changing world of work, an increased need for instant gratification and a generation pre-disposed to seek purpose, millennials are starting to ask these very same questions two-to-three years into their working lives. The mid-life crisis has been moved up by 20 years and has become a quarter-life crisis.

We are asking at a younger age, “What do I want for myself and my life; what is my purpose?”

It also plays a role in ballooning our expectations. Our social network is not an authentic place to connect with friends; instead, it’s become a place to promote the best version of ourselves, whether true or not, to the world. It’s now easier than ever to see what everyone in our social network is doing, where your friend just traveled for vacation, which friend just got a new job, which one just quit their job and went off on a three-month road trip, who’s been promoted and whose company just raised a bunch of money. In this world, the grass is always greener; it makes you examine your life and how it compares to the Photoshopped versions your network promotes on their feeds.

Our increased need for instant gratification — coupled with increased options and visibility to others’ success — drives millennials to seek success, contribution and personal growth at a more rapid rate than other previous generations. Technology has accelerated the millennial timeline.

4. Mid-life crises are accelerating.

Rob, like many teenagers, went to high school with the goal — as determined by his family, teachers and our society — to go to a good college. Once he accomplished this, the societal expectations were to get a good job. In order not to disrupt the status quo, and mostly because he’d adopted these expectations as his own, Rob found a good job.

Twenty years passed, and one day, Rob woke up asking himself, what am I doing? Why am I here, on this earth? What impact do I want to have on the world? What is my purpose?

Rob hit his mid-life crisis, a point in his life where he re-examined his goals and ambitions because for the very first time in his life, there was no one else to tell him what his goals should be. Now he’s got to figure them out on his own.

Due to a changing world of work, an increased need for instant gratification and a generation pre-disposed to seek purpose, millennials are starting to ask these very same questions two-to-three years into their working lives. The mid-life crisis has been moved up by 20 years and has become a quarter-life crisis.

We are asking at a younger age, “What do I want for myself and my life; what is my purpose?”

The $165m home in Palm Beach, Florida — and other bargains

Generation Z has officially entered college. And just as the Millennials before them, this generation is disrupting the way learning happens in higher education. But these differences go beyond just a greater dependence on technology. Gen Z-ers tend to embrace social learning environments, where they can be hands-on and directly involved in the learning process. They expect on-demand services that are available at any time and with low barriers to access. And they tend to be more career-focused earlier on in their college careers.

A study done by Barnes and Noble College shows that today’s students refuse to be passive learners. They aren’t interested in simply showing up for class, sitting through a lecture, and taking notes that they’ll memorize for an exam later on. Instead, they expect to be fully engaged and to be a part of the learning process themselves.

In fact, Gen Z students tend to thrive when they are given the opportunity to have a fully immersive educational experience and they even enjoy the challenges of being a part of it. For instance, 51% of surveyed students said they learn best by doing while only 12% said they learn through listening. These same students also mentioned they tend to enjoy class discussions and interactive classroom environments over the traditional dissemination teaching method.

And the preference towards a collaborative learning environment isn’t just limited to in-person interactions. Instead, Gen Z is completely comfortable with learning alongside other students, even outside of their own school, using digital tools such as Skype and online forums.

And as a digital generation, Generation Z expects digital learning tools such as these to be deeply integrated into their education. For them, technology has always been a fully integrated experience into every part of their lives. And they don’t think education should be any different. They believe they should be able to seamlessly connect academic experiences to personal experiences through these same tools.

Additionally, they expect that these learning tools be available on-demand and with low barriers to access. For them, learning isn’t limited to just the classroom; it’s something that can take place at any time, anywhere.

And finally, access to unlimited new information has created a more self-reliant and career driven generation. In fact, 13% of Gen Z-ers already have their own business. And many are even taking this entrepreneurial spirit to drive changes in college curriculum, as they show a strong interest in designing their own classroom path in college. For those who haven’t started a business quite yet, early preparation is still key. In fact, nearly half of high school students have taken at least one class that counts as college credit.

Part of this change is due to the fact that they have more access to more information than the generations before them. By the time they’ve reached higher ed, they are already well versed in current events, music popular culture, and global trends. They are well aware of the world around them and are already beginning to think through what their place in it will be.

Generation Z is leading the change in how learning takes place. They are a driving force in the innovation of new learning tools, teaching styles, and unlimited access to resources. And they are proving that college is headed in a direction of a more learner-centric environment where students will become the directors of their own futures.

CHRIS SALAMONE

How Generation Z Is Shaping The Change In Education

Source : Forbes

Generation Z has officially entered college. And just as the Millennials before them, this generation is disrupting the way learning happens in higher education. But these differences go beyond just a greater dependence on technology. Gen Z-ers tend to embrace social learning environments, where they can be hands-on and directly involved in the learning process. They expect on-demand services that are available at any time and with low barriers to access. And they tend to be more career-focused earlier on in their college careers.

A study done by Barnes and Noble College shows that today’s students refuse to be passive learners. They aren’t interested in simply showing up for class, sitting through a lecture, and taking notes that they’ll memorize for an exam later on. Instead, they expect to be fully engaged and to be a part of the learning process themselves.

In fact, Gen Z students tend to thrive when they are given the opportunity to have a fully immersive educational experience and they even enjoy the challenges of being a part of it. For instance, 51% of surveyed students said they learn best by doing while only 12% said they learn through listening. These same students also mentioned they tend to enjoy class discussions and interactive classroom environments over the traditional dissemination teaching method.

And the preference towards a collaborative learning environment isn’t just limited to in-person interactions. Instead, Gen Z is completely comfortable with learning alongside other students, even outside of their own school, using digital tools such as Skype and online forums.

And as a digital generation, Generation Z expects digital learning tools such as these to be deeply integrated into their education. For them, technology has always been a fully integrated experience into every part of their lives. And they don’t think education should be any different. They believe they should be able to seamlessly connect academic experiences to personal experiences through these same tools.

Additionally, they expect that these learning tools be available on-demand and with low barriers to access. For them, learning isn’t limited to just the classroom; it’s something that can take place at any time, anywhere.

And finally, access to unlimited new information has created a more self-reliant and career driven generation. In fact, 13% of Gen Z-ers already have their own business. And many are even taking this entrepreneurial spirit to drive changes in college curriculum, as they show a strong interest in designing their own classroom path in college. For those who haven’t started a business quite yet, early preparation is still key. In fact, nearly half of high school students have taken at least one class that counts as college credit.

Part of this change is due to the fact that they have more access to more information than the generations before them. By the time they’ve reached higher ed, they are already well versed in current events, music popular culture, and global trends. They are well aware of the world around them and are already beginning to think through what their place in it will be.

Generation Z is leading the change in how learning takes place. They are a driving force in the innovation of new learning tools, teaching styles, and unlimited access to resources. And they are proving that college is headed in a direction of a more learner-centric environment where students will become the directors of their own futures.

Labels In The Workplace: Don’t Make These Mistakes

Source : Forbes

A friend recently tagged me in a post on LinkedIn to gain my HR insight after a LinkedIn connection of hers had shared a recent recruiting experience.

A recruiter had recently reached out to him to see if he was interested in a position. Typical stuff, right? After going through interviews and completing assessments, the recruiter gave him some unfortunate news. In short, he’s highly skilled and an excellent candidate, but based on his DiSC profile (another personality assessment) results, they fear he won’t be empathetic because he’s a “D,” which stands for “dominant” and that translates as direct, decisive and determined.

This job hunter was forced to promptly discontinue his job search with this company.

This LinkedIn post — or rather, the hiring manager’s logic — rocked my little HR soul.

Here’s why.

Personality Assessments Are Fancy Labels

The problem with labels is that they’re simply shells that contain assumptions. The workplace is laced with labels.

Think about all the different labels we receive at work: DiSC and Myers-Briggs profiles, position title, and words and phrases like: leader, high performing, bad employee, smart, weird, idealist, liberal, difficult to work with, loud, abrasive, kind, married, single, LGBT, etc.

Those are just a few labels I’ve heard leaders use when discussing an employee. These are also labels that we carry with us. The problem with these labels is that they both help and hurt us. Here are a few ways labels may be helping and hindering progress with your performers or potential performers.

How Labels Help

Self-identification: Identification labels help to identify who we are and what we stand for. I can recall reading the results of my own personality assessments and exclaiming, “This is soooo me!” Of course, the test results explain who I am so much more eloquently than I could. This is a natural journey of self-discovery and awareness. Embrace it, enjoy it and learn from it.

Connections: After uncovering more of who you are, the ability to attract others like you is much easier. Stop and think for a moment: How many people in your inner circle are the exact opposite of you? Think about the team you lead. Think about your work friends. This is all good because we are made to connect, and personality tests and other identifiers (like political associations, academic affiliations and social causes) help us link to people who “get” us.

Communities: Once we have a connection, we can create communities. Community is about a feeling of fellowship and the sharing of common interests. Identification is the invitation to connect with others who are like you. It’s a glorious feeling of they get me.

How Labels Hurt 

Rejection: There’s a funny phenomenon that occurs as like minds connect. They also tend to reject differing minds. Once we identify with who we are, we seek and attract more of who we are. This forces us to unconsciously resist the thoughts, ideas, perspectives and beliefs of others. When rejection happens at work, productivity diminishes. When you’re going round-and-round in a meeting about the same topic, stop. Think to yourself, What am I rejecting here?

Limitations: The truth about people is that we’re complex, multifaceted and multidimensional, so labels tend to limit the vast greatness that lies inside us all. Like the hiring manager who thought the candidate wouldn’t work because of his DiSC profile results. Does this mean he can’t be empathic, too? Absolutely not. But labels are inherently built with blinders. Make it a good practice to check your blinders. Don’t limit potential based on an unsubstantiated label.

Assumptions: I know it’s easy and requires little to no effort to make an assumption, we do it all the time. This can come back to bite us because assumptions are full of invalid opinions. Labels lead us to make assumptions because labels eventually turn into stereotypes. Avoid assumptions. My biggest pet peeve about labels and assumptions is that it assumes an individual can’t change, learn and grow.

In the end, I hope we — leaders, individuals, and collective teams — all learn from the mistake of this hiring manager. The lesson is to use the individual’s identity to make a connection. From the connection, don’t assume but ask questions. Inquire and ask a question about that gut feeling that’s making you hesitate to move further with a candidate, partner or idea. Labels are absolutely helpful for bridging gaps and making connections. Labels are also harmful when we fail to seek to understand.

How have labels affected you at work? Will you look at labels differently?