Suspect in Boca Raton car burglaries ID’d

BOCA RATON, Fla. – Police in Boca Raton said one person was taken into custody Tuesday morning in connection with a car burglary case.

Around 5:30 a.m., police asked residents just south of Lynn University to stay indoors while police and K9s searched for car burglars.

Authorities said burglars broke into several vehicles around Banyan Boulevard Circle and Northwest 30th Way near the Boca Bath and Tennis Club.

The suspects were riding around the neighborhood on bicycles, police said.

A police K9 helped arrest one suspect identified as 19-year-old John Perkins of Coconut Creek.

He had property from five car break-ins on the ground near him, police said.

Perkins is facing charges of burglary and grand theft.

Police said he took a bus from Broward County to meet a friend he identified as Chico and they decided to go to Boca Bath and Tennis, smoke weed and break into cars.

Chico has not yet been found.

The $165m home in Palm Beach, Florida — and other bargains

Generation Z has officially entered college. And just as the Millennials before them, this generation is disrupting the way learning happens in higher education. But these differences go beyond just a greater dependence on technology. Gen Z-ers tend to embrace social learning environments, where they can be hands-on and directly involved in the learning process. They expect on-demand services that are available at any time and with low barriers to access. And they tend to be more career-focused earlier on in their college careers.

A study done by Barnes and Noble College shows that today’s students refuse to be passive learners. They aren’t interested in simply showing up for class, sitting through a lecture, and taking notes that they’ll memorize for an exam later on. Instead, they expect to be fully engaged and to be a part of the learning process themselves.

In fact, Gen Z students tend to thrive when they are given the opportunity to have a fully immersive educational experience and they even enjoy the challenges of being a part of it. For instance, 51% of surveyed students said they learn best by doing while only 12% said they learn through listening. These same students also mentioned they tend to enjoy class discussions and interactive classroom environments over the traditional dissemination teaching method.

And the preference towards a collaborative learning environment isn’t just limited to in-person interactions. Instead, Gen Z is completely comfortable with learning alongside other students, even outside of their own school, using digital tools such as Skype and online forums.

And as a digital generation, Generation Z expects digital learning tools such as these to be deeply integrated into their education. For them, technology has always been a fully integrated experience into every part of their lives. And they don’t think education should be any different. They believe they should be able to seamlessly connect academic experiences to personal experiences through these same tools.

Additionally, they expect that these learning tools be available on-demand and with low barriers to access. For them, learning isn’t limited to just the classroom; it’s something that can take place at any time, anywhere.

And finally, access to unlimited new information has created a more self-reliant and career driven generation. In fact, 13% of Gen Z-ers already have their own business. And many are even taking this entrepreneurial spirit to drive changes in college curriculum, as they show a strong interest in designing their own classroom path in college. For those who haven’t started a business quite yet, early preparation is still key. In fact, nearly half of high school students have taken at least one class that counts as college credit.

Part of this change is due to the fact that they have more access to more information than the generations before them. By the time they’ve reached higher ed, they are already well versed in current events, music popular culture, and global trends. They are well aware of the world around them and are already beginning to think through what their place in it will be.

Generation Z is leading the change in how learning takes place. They are a driving force in the innovation of new learning tools, teaching styles, and unlimited access to resources. And they are proving that college is headed in a direction of a more learner-centric environment where students will become the directors of their own futures.

CHRIS SALAMONE

How Generation Z Is Shaping The Change In Education

Source : Forbes

Generation Z has officially entered college. And just as the Millennials before them, this generation is disrupting the way learning happens in higher education. But these differences go beyond just a greater dependence on technology. Gen Z-ers tend to embrace social learning environments, where they can be hands-on and directly involved in the learning process. They expect on-demand services that are available at any time and with low barriers to access. And they tend to be more career-focused earlier on in their college careers.

A study done by Barnes and Noble College shows that today’s students refuse to be passive learners. They aren’t interested in simply showing up for class, sitting through a lecture, and taking notes that they’ll memorize for an exam later on. Instead, they expect to be fully engaged and to be a part of the learning process themselves.

In fact, Gen Z students tend to thrive when they are given the opportunity to have a fully immersive educational experience and they even enjoy the challenges of being a part of it. For instance, 51% of surveyed students said they learn best by doing while only 12% said they learn through listening. These same students also mentioned they tend to enjoy class discussions and interactive classroom environments over the traditional dissemination teaching method.

And the preference towards a collaborative learning environment isn’t just limited to in-person interactions. Instead, Gen Z is completely comfortable with learning alongside other students, even outside of their own school, using digital tools such as Skype and online forums.

And as a digital generation, Generation Z expects digital learning tools such as these to be deeply integrated into their education. For them, technology has always been a fully integrated experience into every part of their lives. And they don’t think education should be any different. They believe they should be able to seamlessly connect academic experiences to personal experiences through these same tools.

Additionally, they expect that these learning tools be available on-demand and with low barriers to access. For them, learning isn’t limited to just the classroom; it’s something that can take place at any time, anywhere.

And finally, access to unlimited new information has created a more self-reliant and career driven generation. In fact, 13% of Gen Z-ers already have their own business. And many are even taking this entrepreneurial spirit to drive changes in college curriculum, as they show a strong interest in designing their own classroom path in college. For those who haven’t started a business quite yet, early preparation is still key. In fact, nearly half of high school students have taken at least one class that counts as college credit.

Part of this change is due to the fact that they have more access to more information than the generations before them. By the time they’ve reached higher ed, they are already well versed in current events, music popular culture, and global trends. They are well aware of the world around them and are already beginning to think through what their place in it will be.

Generation Z is leading the change in how learning takes place. They are a driving force in the innovation of new learning tools, teaching styles, and unlimited access to resources. And they are proving that college is headed in a direction of a more learner-centric environment where students will become the directors of their own futures.

Labels In The Workplace: Don’t Make These Mistakes

Source : Forbes

A friend recently tagged me in a post on LinkedIn to gain my HR insight after a LinkedIn connection of hers had shared a recent recruiting experience.

A recruiter had recently reached out to him to see if he was interested in a position. Typical stuff, right? After going through interviews and completing assessments, the recruiter gave him some unfortunate news. In short, he’s highly skilled and an excellent candidate, but based on his DiSC profile (another personality assessment) results, they fear he won’t be empathetic because he’s a “D,” which stands for “dominant” and that translates as direct, decisive and determined.

This job hunter was forced to promptly discontinue his job search with this company.

This LinkedIn post — or rather, the hiring manager’s logic — rocked my little HR soul.

Here’s why.

Personality Assessments Are Fancy Labels

The problem with labels is that they’re simply shells that contain assumptions. The workplace is laced with labels.

Think about all the different labels we receive at work: DiSC and Myers-Briggs profiles, position title, and words and phrases like: leader, high performing, bad employee, smart, weird, idealist, liberal, difficult to work with, loud, abrasive, kind, married, single, LGBT, etc.

Those are just a few labels I’ve heard leaders use when discussing an employee. These are also labels that we carry with us. The problem with these labels is that they both help and hurt us. Here are a few ways labels may be helping and hindering progress with your performers or potential performers.

How Labels Help

Self-identification: Identification labels help to identify who we are and what we stand for. I can recall reading the results of my own personality assessments and exclaiming, “This is soooo me!” Of course, the test results explain who I am so much more eloquently than I could. This is a natural journey of self-discovery and awareness. Embrace it, enjoy it and learn from it.

Connections: After uncovering more of who you are, the ability to attract others like you is much easier. Stop and think for a moment: How many people in your inner circle are the exact opposite of you? Think about the team you lead. Think about your work friends. This is all good because we are made to connect, and personality tests and other identifiers (like political associations, academic affiliations and social causes) help us link to people who “get” us.

Communities: Once we have a connection, we can create communities. Community is about a feeling of fellowship and the sharing of common interests. Identification is the invitation to connect with others who are like you. It’s a glorious feeling of they get me.

How Labels Hurt 

Rejection: There’s a funny phenomenon that occurs as like minds connect. They also tend to reject differing minds. Once we identify with who we are, we seek and attract more of who we are. This forces us to unconsciously resist the thoughts, ideas, perspectives and beliefs of others. When rejection happens at work, productivity diminishes. When you’re going round-and-round in a meeting about the same topic, stop. Think to yourself, What am I rejecting here?

Limitations: The truth about people is that we’re complex, multifaceted and multidimensional, so labels tend to limit the vast greatness that lies inside us all. Like the hiring manager who thought the candidate wouldn’t work because of his DiSC profile results. Does this mean he can’t be empathic, too? Absolutely not. But labels are inherently built with blinders. Make it a good practice to check your blinders. Don’t limit potential based on an unsubstantiated label.

Assumptions: I know it’s easy and requires little to no effort to make an assumption, we do it all the time. This can come back to bite us because assumptions are full of invalid opinions. Labels lead us to make assumptions because labels eventually turn into stereotypes. Avoid assumptions. My biggest pet peeve about labels and assumptions is that it assumes an individual can’t change, learn and grow.

In the end, I hope we — leaders, individuals, and collective teams — all learn from the mistake of this hiring manager. The lesson is to use the individual’s identity to make a connection. From the connection, don’t assume but ask questions. Inquire and ask a question about that gut feeling that’s making you hesitate to move further with a candidate, partner or idea. Labels are absolutely helpful for bridging gaps and making connections. Labels are also harmful when we fail to seek to understand.

How have labels affected you at work? Will you look at labels differently?

Boca West Community Charitable Foundation Provided Funding for Summer Camp Programs for 1,250 Low Income Kids

Boca West Community Charitable Foundation, which provides grants and volunteers to 25 community non-profit programs that serve local children, has provided funds, instructors, and volunteers for a variety of 2017 summer programs.

The summer programs include a five-week tennis camp held at Boca West Country Club, a two-week golf program, also held at the Club, called Hook A Kid On Golf,

FAU TOPS (Teaching Outstanding Performers), Summer Strings at Lynn University, Camp Wewa, Camp KAVOD, which serves disabled kids and Ball Stars Youth Camp, a basketball camp run by former NBA players.

“Boca West Foundation’s camps and after school programs are fighting each day for the future of their kids against the onslaught of gangs in Palm Beach County,” Sheriff Rick Bradshaw said.

More than 200 children from the Wayne Barton Study Center, Boys & Girls Club, Caridad Center and Florence Fuller Child Development Centers (East and West campuses) attended tennis camp at Boca West Country Club’s tennis center this summer. Each child received new tennis shoes, an outfit and enjoyed lunch each day.

Hook A Kid On Golf, America’s most comprehensive national youth golf program, introduced 25 kids from the Wayne Barton Study Center and 25 kids from the Boys & Girls Club to golf.  Kids from both organizations attended a weeklong golf camp at Boca West Country Club during July.  Children received golf instruction from Boca West Country Club’s golf pros, a t-shirt and a hat. Lunch was provided by the club each day.

“The sneakers, socks, shirts, hats and medals will be fondly remembered by the kids (and especially the delicious food) but it was the patience, caring and kindness on the part of the Boca West Country Club staff that will make a difference in many of the children’s lives,” Arthur Adler, chairman of the Boca West Charitable Foundation, said.

Boca West Community Charitable Foundation also sponsored two music camp programs for children at risk. Because of this funding, the FAU Elementary Band was able to host 180 students from Lake Worth, Delray Beach and Canal Point and the Nat King Cole Generation Hope Summer Strings Program was able to send 200 students to spend a week with students of the Lynn University Philharmonia.

Boca West’s contribution to Camp WeWa meant that 160 Kids from the Boys & Girls Club and SOS Children Villages were able to attend sleep away camp at Camp WeWa in Apopka, Florida. Each participant received swim goggles, a sleeping bag and duffle bag. The Foundation also covered the cost of transportation for the Boys & Girls Club.

The Vital Role Of Positive Feedback As A Leadership Strength

Shutterstock

The Manager’s Perspective

I am about to show you that most managers have some mistaken beliefs about the best kind of feedback to give their subordinates. In a survey of 7,631 managers, my colleague Joe Folkman and I asked whether they believed that giving negative feedback was stressful or difficult and 44% agreed. When talking with managers about giving feedback we often hear comments such as, “I did not sleep the night before,” “I just wanted to get it over quickly,” “My hands were sweating and I was nervous,” and “They don’t pay me enough to do this job.” This result was not surprising to us. But it is not only negative feedback that gives managers pause. A surprisingly large number of managers resist giving their direct reports any kind of positive or negative feedback at all.

Feedback Preferences: 

We created a self-assessment that measured the following:

  • Whether managers avoided or gave any kind of feedback to their colleagues, and
  • Their preference for giving positive or negative feedback.

The assessment used 20 paired comparison items to measure managers’ comfort or aversion to giving positive or negative feedback.

The table below shows the results of this assessment on 7,808 people. Keep in mind that positive feedback refers to reinforcing comments, kudos, compliments and general praise. Negative feedback is defined as redirecting and corrective suggestions that correct mistakes or suggest new actions the subordinate should undertake.

Avoids Neutral Gives
Positive Feedback 37% 20% 44%
Negative Feedback 21% 16% 63%

Given the anxiety nearly half of leaders have about giving negative feedback, it surprised us to find that an even higher percentage of people avoided giving positive feedback (37%) than negative feedback (21%). We can only conclude that many managers feel that it’s their job to tell their direct reports bad news and correct them when they make a mistake, but that taking the time to provide positive feedback is optional.

Self-Ratings and Effectiveness in Giving Feedback

We also asked each participant to rate themselves on their effectiveness at giving others honest feedback. The chart below shows the percentage that agreed with the statement “I would rate myself as highly effective at providing others with honest, straightforward feedback.” We created the bars by using the two scales, “gives positive and gives negative feedback,” and indicating the “tendency to avoid or give such feedback.” It’s clear from the percentages that those who indicated a preference for giving negative feedback felt they were effective at giving others honest, straightforward feedback. Self-ratings appear to be largely driven by the leader’s comfort giving negative feedback. Unfortunately, this is an erroneous conclusion. Giving only negative feedback diminishes a leader’s effectiveness in the eyes of others and does not have the effect they believe it has.

The Recipients Point of View 

How would those who work for and with these people experience their practice of giving positive or negative feedback? We compared 328 managers’ 360 degree feedback assessments with results from their self-assessment instrument that measured their preference for giving positive or negative feedback. In the 360 assessment, an average of 13 respondents were asked to evaluate their leader’s behavior “Gives honest feedback in a helpful way.”

This analysis provided us with some surprising and counter-intuitive data. The recipients gave high scores to leaders who freely gave positive reinforcement. Giving or not giving corrective feedback did not make a big difference unless the leader avoided giving positive feedback.

Similarly, the direct reports’ reactions to the managers who gave positive reinforcement was not highly affected by whether or not the leader accompanied the positive reinforcement with negative or corrective feedback. The key was the manager’s desire to give positive feedback. (Note that this is entirely contrary to what the leader believes.)

 

Feedback

 

In the graph above the numbers in parenthesis represent the number of managers in each cell. Given the fact that we were sub-dividing the group, these numbers would ideally be larger. The results are statistically significant and we are comfortable with our conclusions.

Effectiveness in Developing Subordinates 

After examining these results, we looked at the broader competency of “Developing Others.” In these results, we found the same trend (see the graph below). We then looked at a rating of overall leadership effectiveness. Again, we found a very similar trend.

Feedback

Effectiveness in developing others hinges squarely on the leader’s comfort and willingness to provide positive feedback to the subordinates. Giving corrective or negative feedback (or not) makes little difference if there is a clear presence of positive feedback from the leader.

Implications

Leaders obviously carry some incorrect beliefs about the value and benefits of different forms of feedback. They vastly underestimate the power and necessity of positive reinforcement. Conversely, they greatly overestimate the value and benefit of negative or corrective feedback. In all, they misjudge the impact negative feedback has on how they are perceived by their direct reports.

Source : Forbes

Boca Raton-based Hollander Sleep expands with acquisition of Seattle bedding company

Chances are if you bought a pillow recently it was made by Boca Raton-based Hollander Sleep Products — or perhaps the company it just acquired.

Hollander is a top company in the bedding products market, excluding mattresses. It makes bedding items for well-known brands including Ralph Lauren, Simmons, BeautyRest, Nautica and Waverly. The company manufactures pillows, comforters, mattress pads and other “white” bedding.

In June, Hollander announced the acquisition of Seattle-based Pacific Coast Feather Co., which makes down and down-alternative bedding products. The company makes products for top brands including Pacific Coast, Calvin Klein Home, Jockey, Spring Air and Tahari Home.

“The merger makes Hollander the single-largest supplier in the U.S. in the home textiles industry,” said Jennifer Marks, editor-in-chief of industry publication, Home & Textiles Today. She said Hollander already was the single-largest supplier in the nation of filled utility bedding.

Together, Hollander and Pacific Coast Feather Co. generated $669 million in 2016 sales, Marks said.

Terms of the acquisition were undisclosed by the private companies.

But Hollander’s CEO Mark Eichhorn said Pacific Coast Feather “is a very big investment for us. It is a great complement to our business. We are primarily a synthetic, fiber-filled supplier. Pacific Coast Feather is primarily a natural, down fill. The combination of those two makes a lot of sense,” he said.

Eichhorn said the acquisition will result in a stronger company, complete with manufacturing efficiencies. One reason he wanted to acquire Pacific — a two-year effort — was the company had manufacturing plants with extra capacity. The acquisition will add five more plants.

Eichhorn, who was named CEO in 2015, said he expects to make more acquisitions in related product lines, as well as growing Hollander’s e-commerce business.

“I can foresee this business being a billion-dollar business in the next five years,” he said in an interview last week.

“One of the strengths of this company has always been the quality of the product,” Eichhorn said. “Hollander has been and continues to be recognized in product quality and innovation…We’ve had that position and we’ve held that position. What was holding us back was an inability to execute operationally to service the business.”

Eichhorn, along with Hollander’s senior management, is a part-owner of the company, with major investor Sentinel Capital Partners, a New York equity firm with more than $2.6 billion under management, according to its website.

Thomas A. Ferguson, retired chief operating officer of Newell Rubbermaid, now Newell Brands, said Eichhorn is unusual in that he’s proficient in all aspects of a business: finance, manufacturing processes and mergers and acquisitions.

Eichhorn’s “well-rounded” background led to success at The Anchor Hocking Co., where he was CEO, Ferguson said. Before that, he was an executive for Newell Rubbermaid.

“Mark was always very diligent in the way he looked at a company,” Ferguson said. “He has the tendency of studying and moving ahead, but not until he understands what he’s doing. It’s a very good basis for decision-making.”

Sales had been static at Hollander, but they’re growing in the “mid-single digits,” Eichhorn said, attributing that to the focus on customer service. That’s something he learned from his time at Newell Rubbermaid, where every business meeting began with a focus on service.

“I love factories. I love the people who work in factories. I love the fact that we’re all customers of what we do. I find that both interesting, helpful, and fun,” said Eichhorn, 62. But he conceded he had never gone shopping for a bed pillow before taking the Hollander job.

To prioritize service, the CEO led by example, visiting factories more frequently, and telling employees what better customer service would do for the business.

“Once we saw service improve, new sales opportunities became more readily available to us. Customers just trusted us more. We earned their trust,” Eichhorn said.

Hollander’s on-time shipping and completion of orders, which has risen 96 percent — up 10 percentage points — over the past two years.

“That’s really what it’s all about — keeping the retailer consistently in stock,” he said.

Helen Lee, vice president of merchandising for American Hotel Register, one of Hollander’s biggest customers, said Hollander has been a “strong partner” for many years. She said the company stands out for its “technology and innovation.” The supplier is particularly helpful when its clients — hotel chains including Marriott and Hilton — want to test a new product, such as an upgraded pillow made of a certain fabric.

“They’ve always been very responsive,” she said.

Hollander had its start in 1953 as Hollander Home Fashions in Newark, N.J. It became Hollander Sleep Products when it acquired Louisville Bedding Co. in 2013, and moved the headquarters to Boca Raton.

Today, Hollander employs 117 at headquarters and more than 1,450 in total.

Busy times for the company include the “Back-to-College” season in August and September, when parents buy bedding for their college-aged children. Other seasonal events are the Christmas holidays, where people tend to spruce up their homes for company, and January, which is deemed “white sale” month by retailers.

While Eichhorn has navigated through tough times with other companies, Hollander is a different situation, he said. His work has been to position it for greater growth.

He looks back to his time at Anchor Hocking and recalls how the company sustained sales increases — even during the recession years of 2008 and 2009. Acquisitions were part of the recipe.

“We hope to replicate that here at Hollander,” Eichhorn said.

Source : sun-sentinel