Are Millennials Really That Different From Other Generations?

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Roughly once a week, I’m asked, “Are millennials really that different from other generations?”

I figured it would make sense to share my response with you, distilled into four pivotal factors.

1. Generationally, we are different.

Millennials, individuals who are now between 18-35 years old, were born and raised with different inciting incidents (9/11), different economic factors (the 2008 market crash) and a different culture (helicopter parenting, car seats and more). These factors helped to mold us as a population.

Where baby boomers are loyal to their company and Generation X are more loyal to their careers, millennials’ loyalty lies with their community. We see work as a calling instead of a job, or even a career. Although subtle, this distinction does change the expectations we have of our jobs. Millennials show up looking to make an impact, be part of a team and do meaningful work — work that makes a difference in the world.

Millennials drive companies to challenge the status quo of how the workplace currently operates.

2. There is a new model for the world of work.

Over the last 40 years, as technology has enabled us to automate basic tasks, the type of work we’ve done has changed. We are no longer on the assembly line, making one widget repeatedly. We’ve moved from the Industrial Revolution’s working economy to the knowledge economy, where employees come up with creative solutions to complex problems.

It is no longer sufficient to simply know the task that needs completing. As a knowledge worker, we need to see the bigger picture, the purpose of our work and the problem it is solving,

Although this type of work is completely different, the model of work has yet to change. We are no longer working on assembly lines in factories; nevertheless, we are still expecting people to show up and clock into an office. Many companies are working off a broken model where you are measured by the time you put in versus the output of the work you produce. Millennials, the gig economy, and the future of work are calling for companies to focus on outcomes, not hours.

The old model, which is contradictory to the type of work we are asking people to do, is being questioned by millennials, as they are the first full generation to enter the workforce unbiased by the old, working economy way of work. 

3. The need for “on-demand” is on the rise. 

Millennials have grown up in an on-demand society with pretty much everything at our fingertips. Take a typical day in the life of a millennial, Katy.

Katy wakes up and realizes she’s out of milk, eggs and mouthwash, so she hops onto Amazon, and by the time she’s home from the gym, there’s a delivery at her door. She eats breakfast and orders her ride to work. While at work, Katy toggles between her work email, Gchat, text messages and seeing what everyone’s been up to on Facebook and LinkedIn. On her Lyft home, she orders dinner from her phone and gets it just in time to sit on her couch and choose from thousands of titles to binge watch for the night.

We live in a world where virtually anything can be taken care of in a matter of minutes, right from a device that’s the size of our palm. The impact on our habits and society is noticeable. Our need for instant gratification is at an all-time high. If we want something, we no longer understand what it means to wait.

It also plays a role in ballooning our expectations. Our social network is not an authentic place to connect with friends; instead, it’s become a place to promote the best version of ourselves, whether true or not, to the world. It’s now easier than ever to see what everyone in our social network is doing, where your friend just traveled for vacation, which friend just got a new job, which one just quit their job and went off on a three-month road trip, who’s been promoted and whose company just raised a bunch of money. In this world, the grass is always greener; it makes you examine your life and how it compares to the Photoshopped versions your network promotes on their feeds.

Our increased need for instant gratification — coupled with increased options and visibility to others’ success — drives millennials to seek success, contribution and personal growth at a more rapid rate than other previous generations. Technology has accelerated the millennial timeline.

4. Mid-life crises are accelerating.

Rob, like many teenagers, went to high school with the goal — as determined by his family, teachers and our society — to go to a good college. Once he accomplished this, the societal expectations were to get a good job. In order not to disrupt the status quo, and mostly because he’d adopted these expectations as his own, Rob found a good job.

Twenty years passed, and one day, Rob woke up asking himself, what am I doing? Why am I here, on this earth? What impact do I want to have on the world? What is my purpose?

Rob hit his mid-life crisis, a point in his life where he re-examined his goals and ambitions because for the very first time in his life, there was no one else to tell him what his goals should be. Now he’s got to figure them out on his own.

Due to a changing world of work, an increased need for instant gratification and a generation pre-disposed to seek purpose, millennials are starting to ask these very same questions two-to-three years into their working lives. The mid-life crisis has been moved up by 20 years and has become a quarter-life crisis.

We are asking at a younger age, “What do I want for myself and my life; what is my purpose?”

It also plays a role in ballooning our expectations. Our social network is not an authentic place to connect with friends; instead, it’s become a place to promote the best version of ourselves, whether true or not, to the world. It’s now easier than ever to see what everyone in our social network is doing, where your friend just traveled for vacation, which friend just got a new job, which one just quit their job and went off on a three-month road trip, who’s been promoted and whose company just raised a bunch of money. In this world, the grass is always greener; it makes you examine your life and how it compares to the Photoshopped versions your network promotes on their feeds.

Our increased need for instant gratification — coupled with increased options and visibility to others’ success — drives millennials to seek success, contribution and personal growth at a more rapid rate than other previous generations. Technology has accelerated the millennial timeline.

4. Mid-life crises are accelerating.

Rob, like many teenagers, went to high school with the goal — as determined by his family, teachers and our society — to go to a good college. Once he accomplished this, the societal expectations were to get a good job. In order not to disrupt the status quo, and mostly because he’d adopted these expectations as his own, Rob found a good job.

Twenty years passed, and one day, Rob woke up asking himself, what am I doing? Why am I here, on this earth? What impact do I want to have on the world? What is my purpose?

Rob hit his mid-life crisis, a point in his life where he re-examined his goals and ambitions because for the very first time in his life, there was no one else to tell him what his goals should be. Now he’s got to figure them out on his own.

Due to a changing world of work, an increased need for instant gratification and a generation pre-disposed to seek purpose, millennials are starting to ask these very same questions two-to-three years into their working lives. The mid-life crisis has been moved up by 20 years and has become a quarter-life crisis.

We are asking at a younger age, “What do I want for myself and my life; what is my purpose?”

The $165m home in Palm Beach, Florida — and other bargains

Generation Z has officially entered college. And just as the Millennials before them, this generation is disrupting the way learning happens in higher education. But these differences go beyond just a greater dependence on technology. Gen Z-ers tend to embrace social learning environments, where they can be hands-on and directly involved in the learning process. They expect on-demand services that are available at any time and with low barriers to access. And they tend to be more career-focused earlier on in their college careers.

A study done by Barnes and Noble College shows that today’s students refuse to be passive learners. They aren’t interested in simply showing up for class, sitting through a lecture, and taking notes that they’ll memorize for an exam later on. Instead, they expect to be fully engaged and to be a part of the learning process themselves.

In fact, Gen Z students tend to thrive when they are given the opportunity to have a fully immersive educational experience and they even enjoy the challenges of being a part of it. For instance, 51% of surveyed students said they learn best by doing while only 12% said they learn through listening. These same students also mentioned they tend to enjoy class discussions and interactive classroom environments over the traditional dissemination teaching method.

And the preference towards a collaborative learning environment isn’t just limited to in-person interactions. Instead, Gen Z is completely comfortable with learning alongside other students, even outside of their own school, using digital tools such as Skype and online forums.

And as a digital generation, Generation Z expects digital learning tools such as these to be deeply integrated into their education. For them, technology has always been a fully integrated experience into every part of their lives. And they don’t think education should be any different. They believe they should be able to seamlessly connect academic experiences to personal experiences through these same tools.

Additionally, they expect that these learning tools be available on-demand and with low barriers to access. For them, learning isn’t limited to just the classroom; it’s something that can take place at any time, anywhere.

And finally, access to unlimited new information has created a more self-reliant and career driven generation. In fact, 13% of Gen Z-ers already have their own business. And many are even taking this entrepreneurial spirit to drive changes in college curriculum, as they show a strong interest in designing their own classroom path in college. For those who haven’t started a business quite yet, early preparation is still key. In fact, nearly half of high school students have taken at least one class that counts as college credit.

Part of this change is due to the fact that they have more access to more information than the generations before them. By the time they’ve reached higher ed, they are already well versed in current events, music popular culture, and global trends. They are well aware of the world around them and are already beginning to think through what their place in it will be.

Generation Z is leading the change in how learning takes place. They are a driving force in the innovation of new learning tools, teaching styles, and unlimited access to resources. And they are proving that college is headed in a direction of a more learner-centric environment where students will become the directors of their own futures.

CHRIS SALAMONE

How Generation Z Is Shaping The Change In Education

Source : Forbes

Generation Z has officially entered college. And just as the Millennials before them, this generation is disrupting the way learning happens in higher education. But these differences go beyond just a greater dependence on technology. Gen Z-ers tend to embrace social learning environments, where they can be hands-on and directly involved in the learning process. They expect on-demand services that are available at any time and with low barriers to access. And they tend to be more career-focused earlier on in their college careers.

A study done by Barnes and Noble College shows that today’s students refuse to be passive learners. They aren’t interested in simply showing up for class, sitting through a lecture, and taking notes that they’ll memorize for an exam later on. Instead, they expect to be fully engaged and to be a part of the learning process themselves.

In fact, Gen Z students tend to thrive when they are given the opportunity to have a fully immersive educational experience and they even enjoy the challenges of being a part of it. For instance, 51% of surveyed students said they learn best by doing while only 12% said they learn through listening. These same students also mentioned they tend to enjoy class discussions and interactive classroom environments over the traditional dissemination teaching method.

And the preference towards a collaborative learning environment isn’t just limited to in-person interactions. Instead, Gen Z is completely comfortable with learning alongside other students, even outside of their own school, using digital tools such as Skype and online forums.

And as a digital generation, Generation Z expects digital learning tools such as these to be deeply integrated into their education. For them, technology has always been a fully integrated experience into every part of their lives. And they don’t think education should be any different. They believe they should be able to seamlessly connect academic experiences to personal experiences through these same tools.

Additionally, they expect that these learning tools be available on-demand and with low barriers to access. For them, learning isn’t limited to just the classroom; it’s something that can take place at any time, anywhere.

And finally, access to unlimited new information has created a more self-reliant and career driven generation. In fact, 13% of Gen Z-ers already have their own business. And many are even taking this entrepreneurial spirit to drive changes in college curriculum, as they show a strong interest in designing their own classroom path in college. For those who haven’t started a business quite yet, early preparation is still key. In fact, nearly half of high school students have taken at least one class that counts as college credit.

Part of this change is due to the fact that they have more access to more information than the generations before them. By the time they’ve reached higher ed, they are already well versed in current events, music popular culture, and global trends. They are well aware of the world around them and are already beginning to think through what their place in it will be.

Generation Z is leading the change in how learning takes place. They are a driving force in the innovation of new learning tools, teaching styles, and unlimited access to resources. And they are proving that college is headed in a direction of a more learner-centric environment where students will become the directors of their own futures.

The Vital Role Of Positive Feedback As A Leadership Strength

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The Manager’s Perspective

I am about to show you that most managers have some mistaken beliefs about the best kind of feedback to give their subordinates. In a survey of 7,631 managers, my colleague Joe Folkman and I asked whether they believed that giving negative feedback was stressful or difficult and 44% agreed. When talking with managers about giving feedback we often hear comments such as, “I did not sleep the night before,” “I just wanted to get it over quickly,” “My hands were sweating and I was nervous,” and “They don’t pay me enough to do this job.” This result was not surprising to us. But it is not only negative feedback that gives managers pause. A surprisingly large number of managers resist giving their direct reports any kind of positive or negative feedback at all.

Feedback Preferences: 

We created a self-assessment that measured the following:

  • Whether managers avoided or gave any kind of feedback to their colleagues, and
  • Their preference for giving positive or negative feedback.

The assessment used 20 paired comparison items to measure managers’ comfort or aversion to giving positive or negative feedback.

The table below shows the results of this assessment on 7,808 people. Keep in mind that positive feedback refers to reinforcing comments, kudos, compliments and general praise. Negative feedback is defined as redirecting and corrective suggestions that correct mistakes or suggest new actions the subordinate should undertake.

Avoids Neutral Gives
Positive Feedback 37% 20% 44%
Negative Feedback 21% 16% 63%

Given the anxiety nearly half of leaders have about giving negative feedback, it surprised us to find that an even higher percentage of people avoided giving positive feedback (37%) than negative feedback (21%). We can only conclude that many managers feel that it’s their job to tell their direct reports bad news and correct them when they make a mistake, but that taking the time to provide positive feedback is optional.

Self-Ratings and Effectiveness in Giving Feedback

We also asked each participant to rate themselves on their effectiveness at giving others honest feedback. The chart below shows the percentage that agreed with the statement “I would rate myself as highly effective at providing others with honest, straightforward feedback.” We created the bars by using the two scales, “gives positive and gives negative feedback,” and indicating the “tendency to avoid or give such feedback.” It’s clear from the percentages that those who indicated a preference for giving negative feedback felt they were effective at giving others honest, straightforward feedback. Self-ratings appear to be largely driven by the leader’s comfort giving negative feedback. Unfortunately, this is an erroneous conclusion. Giving only negative feedback diminishes a leader’s effectiveness in the eyes of others and does not have the effect they believe it has.

The Recipients Point of View 

How would those who work for and with these people experience their practice of giving positive or negative feedback? We compared 328 managers’ 360 degree feedback assessments with results from their self-assessment instrument that measured their preference for giving positive or negative feedback. In the 360 assessment, an average of 13 respondents were asked to evaluate their leader’s behavior “Gives honest feedback in a helpful way.”

This analysis provided us with some surprising and counter-intuitive data. The recipients gave high scores to leaders who freely gave positive reinforcement. Giving or not giving corrective feedback did not make a big difference unless the leader avoided giving positive feedback.

Similarly, the direct reports’ reactions to the managers who gave positive reinforcement was not highly affected by whether or not the leader accompanied the positive reinforcement with negative or corrective feedback. The key was the manager’s desire to give positive feedback. (Note that this is entirely contrary to what the leader believes.)

 

Feedback

 

In the graph above the numbers in parenthesis represent the number of managers in each cell. Given the fact that we were sub-dividing the group, these numbers would ideally be larger. The results are statistically significant and we are comfortable with our conclusions.

Effectiveness in Developing Subordinates 

After examining these results, we looked at the broader competency of “Developing Others.” In these results, we found the same trend (see the graph below). We then looked at a rating of overall leadership effectiveness. Again, we found a very similar trend.

Feedback

Effectiveness in developing others hinges squarely on the leader’s comfort and willingness to provide positive feedback to the subordinates. Giving corrective or negative feedback (or not) makes little difference if there is a clear presence of positive feedback from the leader.

Implications

Leaders obviously carry some incorrect beliefs about the value and benefits of different forms of feedback. They vastly underestimate the power and necessity of positive reinforcement. Conversely, they greatly overestimate the value and benefit of negative or corrective feedback. In all, they misjudge the impact negative feedback has on how they are perceived by their direct reports.

Source : Forbes

Partnerships address seniors’ digital divide

Comcast teamed up with The Volen Center in Boca Raton for the south county launch of the Palm Beach County Senior Digital Literacy Initiative, an effort to address seniors’ digital divide.

“This is a countywide initiative for unwired seniors with an emphasis on low-income seniors,” Alex Price, Comcast’s director of Government Affairs & Community Investment – Florida Region, said at the July Fourth-themed luncheon the company sponsored June 27.

“Our seniors need to get into the technology age,” said Patrick Franklin, president and CEO of the Urban League of Palm Beach County. “Technology has left a lot of our seniors behind and we’re trying to bridge the gap.”

The league will instruct the trainers for this and five other sites in the county for free digital training classes.

The Volen Center, 1515 W. Palmetto Park Road, has a computer lab that will be enlarged with more instruction in late summer and early fall, Price said.

“Most seniors tell me they’re not connected,” keynote speaker Kim Clawson, Helpline director for the Area Agency on Aging, told an audience of 225 seniors. “Most of you have family and friends who are out of state.”

“This is great for our families who receive financial assistance,” said Megan Clemmons, executive director of The YMCA Community Outreach Center in the Peter Blum Family YMCA of Boca Raton. “About 1,500 people will get a mailing and there will be signups at the Y.”

The YMCA has a preschool in The Volen Center and The YMCA of South Palm Beach County also oversees the Devos-Blum Family YMCA in Boynton Beach.

“This is helping our seniors to become more independent and pay their bills and buy things online,” said Jared Policano, Volen’s chief operating officer.

Palm Beach County Commissioner Steven Abrams encouraged the audience to learn how to go online to stay in touch with family and get essential county information on hurricanes. Councilman Scott Singer represented the city of Boca Raton.

Comcast brought along 20 employees and set up shop next to the computer to explain Internet Essentials to center users. The program for qualified households offers an Internet connection for $9.95 with no contract or credit check, no installation fee and a discount for a computer.

CHRIS SALAMONE

Boat with 750 pounds of marijuana intercepted off Boca Raton coast

BOCA RATON, Fla. – Six people were taken into custody Saturday after a boat with 750 pound of marijuana was intercepted by the Coast Guard off the coast of Boca Raton.

Officials said a Coast Guard cutter conducted a safety boarding of a 35-foot sport fisher about 11 miles east of Boca Raton.

As the cutter crew came alongside the vessel, they saw a package being jettisoned overboard, which was later recovered by a Coast Guard Station Fort Lauderdale crew.

The cutter crew discovered an additional 17 bales and three packages aboard — seizing about 750 pounds of marijuana.

Aboard the intercepted vessel were three Bahamians, two Jamaicans and one Guyanese.

“This interdiction is a direct success of our focused efforts to defeat these transnational criminal networks,” said Cmdr. Willie Carmichael, acting chief of enforcement for Seventh Coast Guard District said in a news release. “Our newest fast response cutters have proven critical in defending our maritime border, which these criminal organizations seek to exploit.”

The Coast Guard says they are constantly patrolled the waters between the Bahamas and Florida to detect, deter and stop drug smuggling.

Miami-based @USCG cutter crew intercepts suspected drug-smuggling operation. Read more here https://lnks.gd/2/3mWW6d 

 

CHRIS SALAMONE

(LEADER, AUTHOR, ATTORNEY)

 https://vimeo.com/user37757029

 

Boca Raton to open waterfront park at former Wildflower nightclub site

After a fierce six-year debate, more than 2 acres of concrete slab in downtown Boca Raton is on its way to becoming a park.

City Council members this week officially re-designated the former Wildflower nightclub site as a public park Monday. The move is the realization of a public movement that sparked a referendum in November and caused the city to scrap plans for a restaurant at the site.

“It’s a slow-turning ship to get everything done,” Boca City Council member Andrea O’Rourke said. “But it’s happening, it’s in the works and we’re looking forward to that.”

O’Rourke helped push for the referendum last year that caused the change of plans for the property at 552 E. Palmetto Park Road.

Now, the city is working on adding some upgrades before the site is completely redesigned. Plans include rebuilding the sea wall abutting the Intracoastal and putting in a walkway underneath the Palmetto Park bridge to connect the property to Silver Palm Park.

“These are elements that will be included in whatever plan comes to fruition, and the permitting takes time, about six to nine months, so we wanted to get those things in place first,” said Boca spokeswoman Chrissy Gibson.