The $165m home in Palm Beach, Florida — and other bargains

Generation Z has officially entered college. And just as the Millennials before them, this generation is disrupting the way learning happens in higher education. But these differences go beyond just a greater dependence on technology. Gen Z-ers tend to embrace social learning environments, where they can be hands-on and directly involved in the learning process. They expect on-demand services that are available at any time and with low barriers to access. And they tend to be more career-focused earlier on in their college careers.

A study done by Barnes and Noble College shows that today’s students refuse to be passive learners. They aren’t interested in simply showing up for class, sitting through a lecture, and taking notes that they’ll memorize for an exam later on. Instead, they expect to be fully engaged and to be a part of the learning process themselves.

In fact, Gen Z students tend to thrive when they are given the opportunity to have a fully immersive educational experience and they even enjoy the challenges of being a part of it. For instance, 51% of surveyed students said they learn best by doing while only 12% said they learn through listening. These same students also mentioned they tend to enjoy class discussions and interactive classroom environments over the traditional dissemination teaching method.

And the preference towards a collaborative learning environment isn’t just limited to in-person interactions. Instead, Gen Z is completely comfortable with learning alongside other students, even outside of their own school, using digital tools such as Skype and online forums.

And as a digital generation, Generation Z expects digital learning tools such as these to be deeply integrated into their education. For them, technology has always been a fully integrated experience into every part of their lives. And they don’t think education should be any different. They believe they should be able to seamlessly connect academic experiences to personal experiences through these same tools.

Additionally, they expect that these learning tools be available on-demand and with low barriers to access. For them, learning isn’t limited to just the classroom; it’s something that can take place at any time, anywhere.

And finally, access to unlimited new information has created a more self-reliant and career driven generation. In fact, 13% of Gen Z-ers already have their own business. And many are even taking this entrepreneurial spirit to drive changes in college curriculum, as they show a strong interest in designing their own classroom path in college. For those who haven’t started a business quite yet, early preparation is still key. In fact, nearly half of high school students have taken at least one class that counts as college credit.

Part of this change is due to the fact that they have more access to more information than the generations before them. By the time they’ve reached higher ed, they are already well versed in current events, music popular culture, and global trends. They are well aware of the world around them and are already beginning to think through what their place in it will be.

Generation Z is leading the change in how learning takes place. They are a driving force in the innovation of new learning tools, teaching styles, and unlimited access to resources. And they are proving that college is headed in a direction of a more learner-centric environment where students will become the directors of their own futures.

CHRIS SALAMONE

Boca West Community Charitable Foundation Provided Funding for Summer Camp Programs for 1,250 Low Income Kids

Boca West Community Charitable Foundation, which provides grants and volunteers to 25 community non-profit programs that serve local children, has provided funds, instructors, and volunteers for a variety of 2017 summer programs.

The summer programs include a five-week tennis camp held at Boca West Country Club, a two-week golf program, also held at the Club, called Hook A Kid On Golf,

FAU TOPS (Teaching Outstanding Performers), Summer Strings at Lynn University, Camp Wewa, Camp KAVOD, which serves disabled kids and Ball Stars Youth Camp, a basketball camp run by former NBA players.

“Boca West Foundation’s camps and after school programs are fighting each day for the future of their kids against the onslaught of gangs in Palm Beach County,” Sheriff Rick Bradshaw said.

More than 200 children from the Wayne Barton Study Center, Boys & Girls Club, Caridad Center and Florence Fuller Child Development Centers (East and West campuses) attended tennis camp at Boca West Country Club’s tennis center this summer. Each child received new tennis shoes, an outfit and enjoyed lunch each day.

Hook A Kid On Golf, America’s most comprehensive national youth golf program, introduced 25 kids from the Wayne Barton Study Center and 25 kids from the Boys & Girls Club to golf.  Kids from both organizations attended a weeklong golf camp at Boca West Country Club during July.  Children received golf instruction from Boca West Country Club’s golf pros, a t-shirt and a hat. Lunch was provided by the club each day.

“The sneakers, socks, shirts, hats and medals will be fondly remembered by the kids (and especially the delicious food) but it was the patience, caring and kindness on the part of the Boca West Country Club staff that will make a difference in many of the children’s lives,” Arthur Adler, chairman of the Boca West Charitable Foundation, said.

Boca West Community Charitable Foundation also sponsored two music camp programs for children at risk. Because of this funding, the FAU Elementary Band was able to host 180 students from Lake Worth, Delray Beach and Canal Point and the Nat King Cole Generation Hope Summer Strings Program was able to send 200 students to spend a week with students of the Lynn University Philharmonia.

Boca West’s contribution to Camp WeWa meant that 160 Kids from the Boys & Girls Club and SOS Children Villages were able to attend sleep away camp at Camp WeWa in Apopka, Florida. Each participant received swim goggles, a sleeping bag and duffle bag. The Foundation also covered the cost of transportation for the Boys & Girls Club.

New Electric Vehicle Charging Stations are in Boca Raton

Boca Raton residents and visitors with electric vehicles will now have more options to charge their car, as the city has installed three new charging stations.

Two of the three new stations are outside City Hall on West Palmetto Park Road. The other location is at the Spanish River Library. These new stations will be in addition to the one that was installed at the Downtown Library in October 2015.

Each station can charge two cars at once, so up to eight vehicles can be topped off for free at the same time in the city.

“The charging station at the Downtown Library has been a success.” Boca Raton Municipal Services Director Dan Grippo said. “The hope is that the stations are an added benefit and that they support and encourage drivers of electric vehicles.”

The addition of more electric vehicle charging stations continue Boca Raton’s attempts to improve the environment. When the first station was installed, the Downtown Library was recognized with a LEED Silver Certification Plaque, which is awarded for buildings which promote clean energy and health while saving money.

In May, the Boca Raton City Council also adopted a climate change pledge through a unanimous vote. The pledge is a step forward in integrating the Regional Climate Action Plan, which includes 110 recommendations to make Southeast Florida a better place.

Boca Raton Mayor Susan Haynie hopes that the new stations will set an example for other places around the city.

“We hope that more commercial businesses will follow our lead and start installing stations as well,” she said. “Transportation models are changing and electric vehicles are a big part of that
change; we all need to do our part.”

City Council Member Robert Weinroth, who owns his own electric vehicle, agrees with Mayor Haynie’s sentiment. When Boca Raton only had the single charger installed, he would often see that two vehicles were already using it, leaving him unable to. The new chargers will help those kinds of situations, but he hopes that the expanding will not stop there.

“We need to have these all around, not just at the municipal offices,” he said. “I think that conversations with the developers as they’re doing new communities, especially those that are coming in under planned mobility, we have made it clear that we expect that they’re going to be putting in the electric vehicle charge stations.”

CHRIS SALAMONE

Partnerships address seniors’ digital divide

Comcast teamed up with The Volen Center in Boca Raton for the south county launch of the Palm Beach County Senior Digital Literacy Initiative, an effort to address seniors’ digital divide.

“This is a countywide initiative for unwired seniors with an emphasis on low-income seniors,” Alex Price, Comcast’s director of Government Affairs & Community Investment – Florida Region, said at the July Fourth-themed luncheon the company sponsored June 27.

“Our seniors need to get into the technology age,” said Patrick Franklin, president and CEO of the Urban League of Palm Beach County. “Technology has left a lot of our seniors behind and we’re trying to bridge the gap.”

The league will instruct the trainers for this and five other sites in the county for free digital training classes.

The Volen Center, 1515 W. Palmetto Park Road, has a computer lab that will be enlarged with more instruction in late summer and early fall, Price said.

“Most seniors tell me they’re not connected,” keynote speaker Kim Clawson, Helpline director for the Area Agency on Aging, told an audience of 225 seniors. “Most of you have family and friends who are out of state.”

“This is great for our families who receive financial assistance,” said Megan Clemmons, executive director of The YMCA Community Outreach Center in the Peter Blum Family YMCA of Boca Raton. “About 1,500 people will get a mailing and there will be signups at the Y.”

The YMCA has a preschool in The Volen Center and The YMCA of South Palm Beach County also oversees the Devos-Blum Family YMCA in Boynton Beach.

“This is helping our seniors to become more independent and pay their bills and buy things online,” said Jared Policano, Volen’s chief operating officer.

Palm Beach County Commissioner Steven Abrams encouraged the audience to learn how to go online to stay in touch with family and get essential county information on hurricanes. Councilman Scott Singer represented the city of Boca Raton.

Comcast brought along 20 employees and set up shop next to the computer to explain Internet Essentials to center users. The program for qualified households offers an Internet connection for $9.95 with no contract or credit check, no installation fee and a discount for a computer.

CHRIS SALAMONE

Boca Raton Regional Hospital could seek strategic partnership or merger

Boca Raton Regional Hospital announced on Monday that it will explore a “strategic partnership” with another health care provider — a process that could result in a merger or acquisition.

The 400-bed nonprofit hospital has been one of the most successful in South Florida at raising funds for expansion, having established the Marcus Neuroscience Institute, the Christine E. Lynn Women’s Health and Wellness Institute, the Lynn Cancer Institute, and the Gloria Drummond Physical Rehabilitation Institute. It has also grown its physician network, opened urgent care centers, and established an academic partnership with the Florida Atlantic University College of Medicine.

“By any metric, we have evolved into one of the outstanding healthcare providers in the state of Florida,” BRRH Chair Christine E. Lynn said. “Yet, there is another level to which we aspire and a partnership with a provider who shares in our mission, culture and goals will accelerate our ability to reach our full potential.”

The hospital’s board formed a steering committee to evaluate such opportunities. It will be led by Dick Schmidt, a former chair of the hospital board.

The process includes exploring the possibility of a merger or acquisition with a local, statewide or national health care provider, said BRRH President and CEOJerry Fedele. However, the hospital would remain a nonprofit and not become part of a for-profit company, he added.

“Most not-for profit community hospitals embody the essence of their community and Boca Raton Regional is the premier example of a hospital born out of community need and supported by philanthropy and volunteers,” Fedele said.

Forming a strategic partnership would mitigate the challenges of a stand-alone organization, increase its access to capital, and allow it to develop nationally recognized clinical programs, he said.

Fedele previously told the board he would retire at the end of August 2018.

BRRH is one of the few stand-alone nonprofit hospitals remaining in South Florida. Bethesda Health in Boynton Beach is set to merge with Baptist Health South Florida later this year. Jupiter Medical Center is also a stand-alone nonprofit. For-profit hospital chains HCA and Tenet Healthcare Corp. control the majority of hospital beds in Palm Beach County.

Ariana Grande Does What Trump Can’t

For a few hours on Sunday, Ariana Grande, a 23-year-old pop star from Boca Raton, Florida, was the leader of the free world. The position has been open for months. Contestants ranging from German chancellor Angela Merkel to, improbably, Chinese President Xi Jinping have been auditioning for the job.

Two weeks after 22 people were killed and more than 60 injured in a terrorist attack at her “Dangerous Woman” concert in Manchester in the U.K., Grande returned to the city to hallow the ground and soothe the survivors. In the process, she rededicated her generation to the proposition that all men — and women, most definitely women — are created equal.

While President Donald Trump gutter-tweeted argle-bargle and played another round of golf, Grande delivered what will likely stand as the official American response to the bombing in Manchester and to another terrorist attack, the night before the concert, in London.

Her hastily organized “One Love Manchester” benefit concert rejected fear and bitterness. Time and place, along with a leavening of good will, were sufficient to elevate sugary pop songs to public anthems. Watching the concert streaming online, it was obviously more than a good time. Tears flowed. So did joy. Yet it might also be that a good time is among the most powerful collective responses to jihadist nihilism.

Grande didn’t just replace Trump on the world stage for the day, she subtly refuted him, offering a face that was brave and kind in the wake of terror while accomplishing several useful goals — raising money for victims, bolstering courage and making the attacks look both puny and pointless. Whatever the terrorists had hoped to produce in Manchester, it certainly wasn’t this party.

Benefit concerts have a long pedigree. The history tells us something. The original, the Concert for Bangladesh at Madison Square Garden in New York, was organized by George Harrison in 1971. The performers were all male. Grande’s concert, taking place on the same weekend that the female-directed “Wonder Woman” broke the $100 million barrier at the box office, was a potent showcase for young women.

Trump’s dull-witted sexism

, his white-male-only photo ops and the cultural reaction that he both champions and embodies can’t turn back the wave that Grande and company are riding. Trump defeated one woman last November; he can’t defeat them all.

Boat with 750 pounds of marijuana intercepted off Boca Raton coast

BOCA RATON, Fla. – Six people were taken into custody Saturday after a boat with 750 pound of marijuana was intercepted by the Coast Guard off the coast of Boca Raton.

Officials said a Coast Guard cutter conducted a safety boarding of a 35-foot sport fisher about 11 miles east of Boca Raton.

As the cutter crew came alongside the vessel, they saw a package being jettisoned overboard, which was later recovered by a Coast Guard Station Fort Lauderdale crew.

The cutter crew discovered an additional 17 bales and three packages aboard — seizing about 750 pounds of marijuana.

Aboard the intercepted vessel were three Bahamians, two Jamaicans and one Guyanese.

“This interdiction is a direct success of our focused efforts to defeat these transnational criminal networks,” said Cmdr. Willie Carmichael, acting chief of enforcement for Seventh Coast Guard District said in a news release. “Our newest fast response cutters have proven critical in defending our maritime border, which these criminal organizations seek to exploit.”

The Coast Guard says they are constantly patrolled the waters between the Bahamas and Florida to detect, deter and stop drug smuggling.

Miami-based @USCG cutter crew intercepts suspected drug-smuggling operation. Read more here https://lnks.gd/2/3mWW6d 

 

CHRIS SALAMONE

(LEADER, AUTHOR, ATTORNEY)

 https://vimeo.com/user37757029